Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

National Nanotechnology Day is October 9th

Posted on October 4th, 2019 in Uncategorized | No Comments »

The NanoBusiness Commercialization Association (NanoBCA) would like share the following information in regard to National Nanotechnology Day.

National Nanotechnology Day is October 9
What are you doing for #NationalNanoDay?

National Nanotechnology Day is an annual celebration featuring a series of community-led events and activities on or around October 9 to help raise awareness of nanotechnology, how it is currently used in products that enrich our daily lives, and the challenges and opportunities it holds for the future. This date, 10/9, pays homage to the nanometer scale, 10-9 meters.

Planning for various events and activities is underway at schools, universities, and various organizations around the country! The National Nanotechnology Coordination Office is promoting the following activities:

100 Billion Nanometer Dash: Will you be running 100 billion nanometers (or 100 meters)? If so, share your pictures and videos using #100BillionNanometers and #NationalNanoDay.

Sizing Up Nano: How do you explain “nano”? (For example, how does a nanometer compare to the diameter of a strand of hair? Or how thick is a sheet of paper in nanometers?) We welcome your thoughts! Tweet your explanations, pictures, and videos using #sizingupnano and #NationalNanoDay.

Visit https://www.nano.gov/nationalnanotechnologyday for more information, or email us at NND@nnco.nano.gov to let us know what activities you are planning for National Nanotechnology Day!  


Nanotechnology Research Center Needs Input

NIOSH is working with RTI International to distribute a survey to companies that manufacture, distribute, fabricate, formulate, use, or provide services related to engineered nanomaterials. The goal of the survey is to assess the impact of NIOSH’s contribution to guidelines and risk mitigation practices for the safe handling of engineered nanomaterials in the workplace. Feedback from this survey will inform NIOSH’s research agenda to enhance relevance and impact on creating guidance to manage nanomaterial workers safety and health. The survey will only take about 20 minutes to complete. If you or someone you know receives an invitation to complete this survey, please know that we look forward to and value your input! If you have any questions, contact Adrienne Eastlake, aeastlake@cdc.gov.


Manufacturing Day is Friday, October 4th

Held annually on the first Friday in October, Manufacturing Day helps show the reality of modern manufacturing careers by encouraging thousands of companies and educational institutions around the nation to open their doors to students, parents, teachers and community leaders.

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE


Hope you will be able to participate in National Nanotechnology Day!

NanoBCA Recommends: NNCO Webinar – Tues 7/9 Noon-1PM ET

Posted on July 8th, 2019 in Uncategorized | No Comments »

The NanoBusiness Commercialization Association (NanoBCA) would like to recommend the 2019 Nano EHS Webinar Series offered by the National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO). The details for the next webinar are listed below.

Nanotechnology-Related Standards: Availability and Applications
Tuesday, July 9, 2019
Noon – 1PM ET

Click here to REGISTER

SPEAKERS
– Dr. Mark Ballentine (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers)
– Dr. Scott Brown (The Chemours Company)
– Dr. Katherine Tyner (U.S. Food and Drug Administration)

MODERATOR
Dr. Ajit Jillavenkatesa (National Institute of Standards and Technology)

OVERVIEW
The development and use of nanotechnology-related standards is critical to ensuring validated measurements and methods to specify nanomaterial-containing products. Standards are also necessary for comparative evaluation and assessment of the EHS effects. This webinar will discuss various existing and ongoing standards efforts and will highlight case studies from industry and government on how these standards are being applied and supporting nanoEHS research and safer product design. This webinar will also discuss how interested stakeholders can engage in these efforts.

December 3, 2018, marked the 15th anniversary of the authorization of the NNI. As part of the NNI’s year-long celebration, the 2019 NanoEHS webinar series focuses on the state of the science in this important area.

Please use the login link sent with your registration confirmation email to attend the webinar, or login here

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We recently completed our 18th Annual NanoBusiness Conference on June 4th in DC. Lisa Friedersdorf, Director of the National Nanotechnology Coordination Office spoke at our event on the topic of Research & Commercialization – 15 Years of Progress with the NNI.

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NanoBCA INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIP

CLICK HERE to become a NanoBCA INDIVIDUAL MEMBER

Annual Individual Membership fee $250

The NanoBusiness Commercialization Association is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, your contribution is tax-deductible.

Features of NanoBCA Individual Membership include:
– Invitation to participate on our monthly NanoBCA conference calls
– Networking Opportunity – access to members who have provided their email addresses for contact from other NanoBCA Members

Our members value the monthly conference calls and annual event.  These are the two major features of NanoBCA membership.

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Hope you will be able to participate on tomorrow’s NNCO public webinar.

NanoBCA Recommends: NNI Stakeholder Workshop Aug 1-2 DC

Posted on July 1st, 2019 in Uncategorized | No Comments »

The NanoBusiness Commercialization Association (NanoBCA) would like to recommend the following National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) Stakeholder Workshop.

The Future of the NNI: A Stakeholder Workshop
DATES
Thursday, August 1, 2019
Friday, August 2, 2019

LOCATION
Hilton Washington DC National Mall
480 L’Enfant Plaza
Washington, DC 20024

SCOPE
The NNI has played a pivotal role in fostering and advancing a dynamic nanotechnology ecosystem in support of the initiative’s four goals: advance world-class research, foster commercialization, develop and sustain research infrastructure, and support the responsible development of nanotechnology. Building on this strong foundation, experts from the nanotechnology community will share their perspectives on the key elements required for the nanotechnology enterprise to thrive over the next 15 years.

Click here to view AGENDA

Click here to REGISTER

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact: 2019stakeholderworkshop@nnco.nano.gov.

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UPCOMING EVENT
ELI Summer School Series 2019: Law & Policy of Products Regulation
Tuesday, July 23, 2019
Washington DC and via webinar
Register online by Thursday, July 18, 2019

The life cycle of industrial, agricultural, and antimicrobial chemical products, especially those embedded in consumer products, has gained increasing public attention. Regulators are looking at the entire product lifecycle, including post-discard of product at the end of its useful life, as well as toxicity data. Lynn L. Bergeson, Managing Partner, Bergeson & Campbell P.C. (B&C®), will present chemical product regulations matters including risk communication, minimizing legal liability, and evolving policy matters.

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We recently completed our 18th Annual NanoBusiness Conference on June 4th in DC. Lisa Friedersdorf, Director of the National Nanotechnology Coordination Office spoke at our event on the topic of Research & Commercialization – 15 Years of Progress with the NNI.

———————————–
NanoBCA INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIP
CLICK HERE to become a NanoBCA INDIVIDUAL MEMBER
Annual Individual Membership fee $250

The NanoBusiness Commercialization Association is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, your contribution is tax-deductible.

Features of NanoBCA Individual Membership include:

– Invitation to participate on our monthly NanoBCA conference calls

– Networking Opportunity – access to members who have provided their email addresses for contact from other NanoBCA Members

Our members value the monthly conference calls and annual event.  These are the two major features of NanoBCA membership.

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The NanoBCA was present during the signing of the 21st Century Nanotechnology Research and Development Act on December 3, 2003. The NNI has been at the foundation of our nanotechnology community since day one. As the Executive Director and Founder of the NanoBCA, I will be offering my perspectives on Thursday, August 1st. Hope you will be able to share your views with us in DC!

NanoBCA Conference Call – Thursday 6/20 2PM ET

Posted on June 19th, 2019 in Uncategorized | No Comments »

We will be having our monthly NanoBusiness Commercialization Association (NanoBCA) conference call:

Date: Thursday, June 20, 2019
Time: 2:00-2:45 PM ET

Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. 
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/227885461 

You can also dial in using your phone. 
United States: +1 (646) 749-3122 
Access Code: 227-885-461

First GoToMeeting? Let’s do a quick system check: https://link.gotomeeting.com/system-check

Please mute your line if you are not speaking.  Thank you.

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AGENDA

2:00-2:05  Opening Remarks
Vincent Caprio
Executive Director, NanoBusiness Commercialization Association (NanoBCA)
vincent@nanobca.org

18th Annual NanoBusiness Conference
Tuesday, June 4, 2019
K&L Gates Washington DC

Click here to view CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS
Click here to view CONFERENCE PHOTOS

Lifetime Achievement Award for Paul Stimers, Partner, K&L Gates

2:05-2:15 Observations from 18th Annual NanoBusiness Conference
Recap of Arthur Herman’s Presentation: Envisioning the Quantum Future
Steve Waite, Author

2:15-2:25 EHS Update
Lynn L. Bergeson
Managing Director, Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.
NanoBCA EHS Chair
lbergeson@lawbc.com

Former EPA Administrators Address Direction of EPA in House Committee Hearing
Recent Federal Developments

2:25-2:40 Legislative Update
Paul Stimers
Partner, K&L Gates
NanoBCA Policy Advisor
paul.stimers@klgates.com

2:40-2:45 Q&A

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Looking forward to our call.

Final Agenda: Water 2.0 Conference 6/5 DC

Posted on June 19th, 2019 in Uncategorized | No Comments »

Today we are excited to share the Final Agenda for our:

Water 2.0 Conference: Advancing Water Infrastructure Repair
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

REGISTER TODAY $250

CONFERENCE LOCATION
K&L Gates
1601 K Street, NW
Washington, D.C. 20006-1600

The Water 2.0 Conference: Advancing Water Infrastructure Repair will focus on the use of data analytics, software, cyber security for water utilities and industrial water users. Participants will include water and energy industry authorities, utilities professionals and representatives from the EPA.

Speakers for the Water 2.0 Conference Include:

The event opens at 8AM with a Continental Breakfast.  Lunch will be served from Noon-1:PM. The conference will conclude after lunch.

AGENDA

8:00-8:30  Registration & Continental Breakfast
K&L Gates, 1601 K Street, NW, Washington, DC 20006-1600

8:30  Opening Remarks and Introductions
Vincent Caprio, Water 2.0 Executive Director & Conference Chair

8:30-9:00  Generation “Next”: Attracting and Retaining the BEST Talent for an Evolving Infrastructure
Kenneth E. Russell, PhD, Consulting Executive and Author

9:00-9:30 Non Revenue Water and the oncoming Infrastructure Crisis in America
Nate Wilson, Water Quality Product Lead, Mueller

9:30-10:00 Reusing Produced Water in the Cheese Industry with MicroEVAP™
Karen Sorber, Executive Chair/CEO, Micronic Technologies

10:00-10:30  At the Edge: The IoT Cyber Security Imperative
Paul Clayson, CEO, AgilePQ

10:30-11:00  Point of Use filtration: How to protect your water while waiting for the infrastructure to be fixed
Bryan Eagle, CEO, Glanris

11:00-11:30  Doing more with less: Simple solution for Corrosion, Scale and Microbial control
Soohyun Julie Koo, President & CEO, IOREX Global Company

11:30-Noon  Water Investing: State of the Union 2019
– Vincent Caprio, Water 2.0 Executive Director & Conference Chair
– Jim Hurd, Director, GreenScience Exchange

Noon-1:00  Lunch

1:00  Conclusion

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Questions in regard to the event may be directed to:
Vincent Caprio vincent@water2.org

Click here to see completed Water 2.0 events

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The Water 2.0 Conference Series offers outstanding opportunities to connect with a diverse water-related group of professionals in the heart of Washington DC.  We hope you will be able to join us!

NanoBCA Interview: Mihail (Mike) Roco, Senior Advisor for Science & Engineering, NSF

Posted on May 28th, 2019 in Uncategorized | No Comments »

We are excited to share the next interview of our NanoBCA Interview Series. Through this series we offer in-depth interviews with some of the key stakeholders influencing our nanotechnology community today. Many of these dynamic professionals will be participants at our:

18th Annual NanoBusiness Conference
Tuesday, June 4, 2019

REGISTER HERE $250

CONFERENCE LOCATION

K&L Gates
1601 K Street, NW
Washington, D.C. 20006-1600

Our next interview is with Mihail (Mike) Roco, Senior Advisor for Science & Engineering, National Science Foundation.

Steve Waite: Thanks for taking time to speak with us today, Mike. You have been involved in nanotechnology at a very high level for many years. How did it all begin?

Mike Roco: I started as a faculty of mechanical engineering at the University of Kentucky in 1981 where I became full professor in four years. While at the University of Kentucky, I received two grants through the National Science Foundation (NSF) to explore ultrafine particle dynamics and multiphase systems and several contracts from IBM and other companies to explore small particles in reverse coating and two-phase machineries. In 1986-1987 I was visiting professor at Caltech and Tohoku University.  In 1990, I proposed a new research program to the NSF for the U.S. government through the Emerging Technologies competition that encompassed the synthesis of nanoparticles at high rates. That program was relatively small, only $3 million per year over a period of six years.

During this time, I realized that research in this area was a much broader topic that crosses and unifies many scientific fields, with potential to become a general-purpose technology. This realization led to collaboration with experts from diverse fields and the preparation of a report titled “Nanotechnology Research Directions: Vision for the Next Ten Years and Beyond.” It was published in 1999 and was adopted by the National Science and Technology Council, White House, as an official report. This became the foundational document for the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI). Later it was adopted in research planning in over 80 countries.  It proposed a unified definition of nanotechnology as well as a 10-year outlook for exploration in key R&D sectors and a vision for the next thirty years. This was equivalent to a phase change for the scientific community. Prior to this, only a few people in physics and chemistry were interested. After the unified definition became accepted, other scientists and engineers from many other fields expressed an interest in nanotechnology. The NSF became the playground for the first phase of nanotechnology research. I should note that there was a lot of skepticism in the scientific and industry communities about nanotechnology when we started out (e.g., What is new? When would be the first product?).

SW: There always seems to be a great deal of skepticism when a revolutionary technology is in its infancy.

MR: Yes. In our case, we used the NSF as a playground to ramp up the research in nanotechnology. Over time, the work in nanotechnology blossomed in the U.S. as well as overseas. I am the founding Chair of the Subcommittee on Nanoscale Science and Engineering set up in 2000 at the White House, the interagency organization that steered the NNI.  Currently I am Senior Advisor for Science and Engineering at the NSF.

SW: As a key architect of the NNI, what did you see as the need for a National Nanotech Initiative?

MR: To provide some context, at that time the President was looking at creating an R&D program that would have a long-term impact and recognition. A competition was organized by the White House under the auspices of the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) and Economic Council. In March 1999, I was invited to the White House in the Old Indian Treaty Room to speak about nanotechnology. Then I proposed the NNI on behalf of an interagency group with an annual budget of $500 million dollars in 2001. They gave me ten minutes. Believe it or not, we ended up speaking for over two hours.

SW: Wow! It sounds like you hit the idea out of the park at that meeting.

MR: It was a seminal event for nanotechnology in the U.S. After the event, the White House gave us approval to speak about the potential for a national program. This work became the foundation for the national science, engineering and technology initiative in nanotechnology, which was unveiled by President Clinton at Caltech in early 2000. By 2019, four Presidents (Clinton, Bush, Obama and Trump) have supported the initiative and each highlighted it as a model for S&T national programs.  The cumulative investment is about $27 billion since the inception of the NNI including the 2019 budget estimate. After the announcement of the NNI, nanotechnology has become de facto an international science and technology initiative, a competitive domain between U.S., Europe, Asia and Australia.  The vision of the NNI has been long term in nature (see: “The Long View of Nanotechnology Development: “The National Nanotechnology Initiative at 10 years”). We saw nanotechnology having an impact on industry and society at large over the course of decades.

To answer your question, the need for the NNI came out of the realization that the control of matter at the nanoscale is important to the entire economy and society. We saw the NNI as fostering the research necessary to control matter at the nanoscale. There was a gap in knowledge between the 1 to 100 nanometer level. People did not have concepts to understand the functioning of matter at this small scale. There was no accepted unifying concept across all the fields. Initially, there was fragmentation. The opportunity we saw with the NNI was associated with the nature of nanotechnology as a general-purpose technology that will have a widespread impact across all sectors of the economy. We saw the NNI as fostering activities that were collegial across scientific fields and across agencies.

We saw nanotechnology evolving through the NNI in three phases. First, one has to develop the basic concepts and components. We envisioned it taking roughly ten years to develop the foundation science and create a library of nanocomponents from most elements of the periodic table. The second phase involved the integration of nanotechnology components in larger structures that are useful nanodevices, biosensors, hierarchical structures of polymers and artificial tissues, to name a few. The third phase, which is expected to be in full effect after 2020, is integration with other systems to be used effectively and economically in almost every product. For all of this to happen, we needed general methods for nanoscale investigation, design, manufacturing, and integration with other emerging fields. By the end of the third decade, the vision is to have methods of design and manufacturing for effective integration of nanotechnology in industry, medicine, space, etc. I think we are on this path.

SW: It certainly seems that way.

MR: Yes. To give an example. As you know, in semiconductors more than 70% are based on nanoscale phenomena and components if we speak about the U.S. based companies. In advanced chemicals, it is more than 40%.  About the same for pharmaceuticals. We already see that the penetration of nanotechnology is significant, and yet we are still at an early stage, as the concepts and processes are evolving. Nanotechnology is improving continuously. Once we have the methods of how to design economically at the nanoscale level, penetration will accelerate. We knew when we started that we had to develop this foundational knowledge of how to create larger structures from the nanoscale on up. Where we are now, the critical problem is to be able to create by design and to manufacture larger structures that have multiple functions and can be integrated into larger systems.

Another major challenge today is to integrate nano with bio, information, artificial intelligence, and cognitive science. Other challenges at the present time include the need to do sustainable nanotechnology for global sustainability and to use nano as a condition for modern biology (e.g., gene editing and nanorobotics for surgery). Nano is now an integral part of the revolution in medicine. Within this field, there is a major challenge for nanotechnology to help create brain-to-brain, brain-to-machine, brain-like devices and hardware systems for artificial intelligence. I would also note that a field that started from nanoscale science and engineering is quantum. There is a focus today on quantum communications and quantum computing that stems from the foundational work we have done in nano.

It is important to note that nanotechnology is a foundational field. Since the year 2000, we have seen many spinoff fields. For instance, in 2003 in the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) we created a quantum science and technology group that was a spin off on the NNI. That was done on a more confidential basis for fifteen years. This year we have a quantum initiative at the national level in the U.S. There are more than twenty fields today that started specifically from the NNI research programs. For example, we started a program in metamaterials in 2004. Within a period of three years, we went from one NSF proposal in this area to hundreds of proposals and thousands of publications.

I would also point out that synthetic biology and plasmonics were enabled as part of the NNI up to 2004 and were subsequently spun off. The Materials Genome Initiative initially started from the nanomaterials-by-design modeling and simulation area of focus within NNI. The basic concepts from the nanophononics area formed a foundation and evolved to be integrated in the 2012 National Photonics Initiative. Other notable fields that were spun out of the NNI research programs and at the confluence with other foundational areas are: nanofluidics, carbon electronics, nanotechnology sustainability, nanostructured wood fibers, DNA nanotechnology, protein nanotechnology, and nanoscale-mesoscale systems.

My point is nano is a foundational field that creates a base and has not only created new knowledge, but new fields of science and new disciplines. There are successive phases of growth to a foundational field such as nanotechnology, as well as many players. There is no ending. There is an evolution that takes place over many decades.

SW: Given what you have learned over the years, what types of things would you have done differently, if any, to make the NNI more effective?

MR: The NNI started out as a science project and blossomed into a unified knowledge base and a community that did not exist before. We also have created a flexible infrastructure for research and production. This would not have happened without the organization that went into the NNI. We can also see that the work associated with NNI has inspired other emerging technologies. When I think about what could have been done differently, we have to recognize that when we began we faced some limitations. One limitation was the ability to engage with industry from the beginning. That said, the NanoBusiness Alliance launched in 2001 at an early stage of the NNI. But there was fragmentation within industry, due to various factors, that limited progress. Nevertheless, industry has adopted nanotechnology, even if it has not been widely advertised over the years. Based on our estimates, nanotechnology today accounts for products that cumulatively represent more than 4% of U.S. GDP, which equates to about three quarters of a trillion dollars.

SW: We vividly recall those trillion-dollar projections for nanotech in the world. Are we there?

MR:  Our estimation published in 2001 was that the worldwide revenues from products that have nanotechnology as the key feature for competitiveness would reach one trillion dollars by 2015, of which about one third would be in the U.S.  If we use the Lux Research industry surveys, in agreement with other estimations and extrapolations, we reached both of those worldwide and U.S targets in 2013. Now, I would like to add that another limitation was the inability to develop applications quickly caused slower than expected progress in modeling, simulation and design. For example, as we go to larger structures, we cannot use trial and error like we can do with nanoparticles. If you want to build a system, one has to develop better generalized theories that include all of the phenomena and types of interactions. This, in my opinion, is still a place where we can improve. When I look at Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) I think we have done pretty well overall because we started to focus on this at the beginning. Now the focus is shifting to ELSI (Ethical, Legal and Societal Implications) that have become just as important as EHS because we are moving to larger and more complex systems.

In summary, when I look back certainly some things could be improved. But overall, I think we had a very good macro approach to address the foundational general-purpose technology that is nanotechnology. After 2007, there was a perception that we have the results and now all we need are applications. However, I believe that we must continue to develop the methods for new nanotechnology generations in parallel with translational efforts and applications.

SW: How do you see the NNI evolving in the years ahead?

MR: We have not generalized efficient methods for manufacturing or generalized methods for integration with nanotechnology. In my view, this has to be a focus going forward. We are at the end of the second phase of development I spoke about earlier. The next phase, the third one, will see the development of new architectures for nanotechnology as well as new methods that are generalized and can be applied economically. The moment to capitalize on results we have obtained with the NNI is coming during the next phase, which will take out us to 2030 and beyond. Nanotechnology blossoms into its full potential when you can develop new architectures and integrate it into society economically and efficiently to tackle some of the biggest challenges we see today. We are on the path, but we have a lot more work ahead. I do believe the NNI can continue to play a role in helping to foster the development of nanotechnology in the decade ahead.

SW: You co-authored a book in 2011 titled, Nanotechnology Research Directions for Societal Needs in 2020: Retrospective and Outlook.” The year 2020 is around the corner. Where are we on your Nanotechnology 2020 roadmap?

MR: That’s a very good question. Almost all the important targets we discussed in the book are on the way. The progress over the past decade has been significant. There is a great deal of work in nanotechnology being done outside of the U.S. There is a realization overseas that now is the time to reap the benefit of nanotechnology, so they are investing more. There is a research challenge as well as a development challenge. I think this has to continue in order to reap the benefits of nanotechnology in the decade ahead. Nanotechnology is an inspirational and enabling field for new science and technology platforms.  Key areas of converging technologies integrated from the nanoscale have been benchmarked in more than 30 countries in the report “Convergence of Knowledge, Technology and Society.” Many visionary ideas were initially advanced in the foundational convergence report, “Converging Technologies for Improving Human Performance: Nanotechnology, Biotechnology, Information Technology and Cognitive Sciences,” are on their way of realization. 

SW: We have reached the 7-nanometer level in semiconductors. There is a lot of discussion in the semiconductor industry these days about the need for new types of architectures and designs. What role can nanotechnology play in fostering these new architectures and designs?

MR: Nanotechnology offers the opportunity to develop new architectures for computing. We have gone a long way in developing new nanoscale components. Now we have to go to the next phase to create new principles and new architectures at the nanoscale level. Computation in the cell is at the nanoscale level. Computing in the quantum is at the nanoscale level. Computing for photonics and optics is at the nanoscale level. We were discussing quantum when we launched the NNI. A separate spin-off program was created for quantum in 2003. Nanotechnology has the potential to usher in new architectures for semiconductors and for computing such as quantum. The field for these new architectures is completely wide open. In addition, AI offers new ways to design, manufacture and use nanosystems.  A key challenge is building the nano-enabled hardware to be suitable and work well with the AI software.

I should add that the NSF currently has a collaboration with the SRC (Semiconductor Research Corporation) and NIST. There are nearly two dozen new ideas of how to progress, even in the nanoelectronics domain. The scientific and engineering challenges we see in semiconductors today are even richer than they were twenty years ago when the NNI was launched.  Benchmarking of new computing elements and their assemblies using convergence performance criteria is a promising opportunity of selecting priorities.

SW: How do you see the NSF’s role in nanotechnology evolving in the years ahead? 

MR: NSF is addressing all the fields of nanoscale science and engineering. We have about 6,000 active awards focused on upward research going from quantum, to biosensors, to building nanostructures using bio principles from synthetic biology. A portion of these are in so-called core programs where you leave people open to proposing any idea while others are conceptually-driven top-down, so-called big ideas or focused solicitations. In parallel, we have three other activities. One is to create the infrastructure focused on the academic field. The second is education and training. In education we look to various methods, from individualized learning, to virtual reality to using convergence methods. Thirdly, we look to societal implications of the research done and possible applications. The NSF has the most focus on this area. We also look at economic, environmental, health, and ethical issues related to nanotechnology development and the development of other emerging fields in connection with nanotechnology.

I should add that the NSF has a lot of international collaborations. More than 20 percent of the 6,000 awards have formal international collaborations. We train 10,000 students per year, which is a large number. We have about 30 large centers and about 14% of all awards made by the NSF have nanotechnology inside in the last five years. In addition, NSF annually funds about 25 new SBIR/STTR nanotechnology awards, as well an increasing amount for Grant Opportunities for Academic Liaison with Industry (GOALI) for joint academe-industry research awards, I-Corps for innovation training linking completed basic research professionals to entrepreneurs and industry, and INTERN for graduate student internships in industry.

SW: What type advice would you give to a high school student today who is interested in nanotechnology?

MR: Nano is exciting, is futuristic, it applies to all of the material world, and is highly rewarding. For the past several years, NSF has organized a national competition for high school students called Nano Generation. We give prizes to the winners. Next year, this will be merged together with the Museum of Science activities across the U.S. For a high school student, it is essential to follow this line of thought: The specific fields of jobs changes continually. However, if you learn something more foundational, you can cross from one field to another. To have a good salary in the U.S., you need to have a good education. Considering that nanotechnology is a general field that crosses and intersects with many fields, if you learn nanoscale science and engineering well you can find a job in many fields. Secondly, if you have a background in nanotechnology you may have a higher qualification that will put you in a better position to have an interesting and fulfilling job. From a broader intellectual point of view, nanotechnology offers a grand perspective of nature, and how things work around us.  

SW: Last question for today, Mike. What type of advice would you give to policymakers today with respect to encouraging the development of nanotechnology in the future?

MR: I do this every day. There are many challenges ahead, increasingly more sophisticated and more impactful. The main technical direction I think now is to construct larger nanostructured systems with more atoms, information and complexity contents that can be integrated economically and to work together with information, quantum, bio and artificial intelligence. Nanotech cannot strive in isolation. Nano is the foundational technology from which other technologies can emerge and evolve. The convergence with other foundational fields such information technology and cognitive science to name a couple, can help foster sustainable economic development.

From my vantage point, nanotech becomes part of the solution in many fields. It is not a solution just for a final product. From the beginning it has to be integrated with other ideas. Those who do nanoscience and engineering are engaged in multidisciplinary science that includes bio, cognitive, information and other fields. In fact, nanotechnology is one of the foundational fields together with digital technology that are general purpose in nature. As a confirmation, nanotechnology is critical to all newly announced WH Industries of the Future (March 2019) to receive priority in funding: Artificial Intelligence, Advanced Manufacturing, Quantum Information Science, and 5G networks. In summary, I see nanotechnology evolving to larger, more sophisticated systems that maintain the nanoscale behavior at the smaller scale while at the same time integrating with other emerging technologies.

SW: Thank you for your time today, Mike. The NanoBCA commends you for all of the great work in nanotechnology you have done over the years. We wish you all the best in the future.

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Steve Waite is the author of several books including Quantum Investing and Venture Investing in Science.

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I hope you enjoyed this month’s interview. Our 18th Annual NanoBusiness Conference offers outstanding opportunities to connect with a diverse nanotechnology-related group of professionals in the heart of Washington DC.  We hope you will be able to join us on June 4th!

Agenda Update: Water 2.0 Conference 6/5 DC

Posted on May 28th, 2019 in Uncategorized | No Comments »

Today we are excited to share an Agenda Update for our: 

Water 2.0 Conference: Advancing Water Infrastructure Repair
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

REGISTER TODAY $250

CONFERENCE LOCATION(S)

We will be meeting at 10:00am for a continental breakfast at the law offices of K&L Gates1601 K Street, NW, Washington, DC.From there we will proceed to Russell Senate Building, Room 385 where the conference will be located.

Speakers for the Water 2.0 Conference Include:

AGENDA

10:00-11:00  Registration & Continental BreakfastK&L Gates, 1601 K Street, NW, Washington, DC 20006-1600

Opening Remarks and Introductions
Vincent Caprio, Water 2.0 Executive Director & Conference Chair

11:00-11:30  In transit to Capitol Hill – Russell Senate Office Building

11:30  Conference Presentations begin at Russell Senate Office Building – Room 385

11:30-Noon Innovation as a Service
Alan Hinchman, Chief Revenue Officer, GrayMatter Systems

Noon-12:30 Kenneth E. Russell, PhD, Consulting Executive and Author

12:30-1:30  Lunch

1:30-2:00  Nate Wilson, Water Quality Product Lead, Mueller

2:00-2:30  Karen Sorber, Executive Chair/CEO, Micronic Technologies

2:30-3:00  At the Edge: The IoT Cyber Security Imperative
Paul Clayson, CEO, AgilePQ

3:00-3:30 Point of Use filtration: How to protect your water while waiting for the infrastructure to be fixed
Bryan Eagle, CEO, Glanris

3:30-4:00  Soohyun Julie Koo, President & CEO, IOREX Global Company

4:00-4:30  Water Investing: State of the Union 2019
Vincent Caprio, Water 2.0 Executive Director & Conference Chair
Jim Hurd, Director, GreenScience Exchange

4:30  Conclusion

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Questions in regard to the event may be directed to:
Vincent Caprio vincent@water2.org

Click here to see completed Water 2.0 events

—————————————————————————
The Water 2.0 Conference Series offers outstanding opportunities to connect with a diverse water-related group of professionals in the heart of Washington DC.  We hope you will be able to join us!

Final Agenda: 18th Annual NanoBusiness Conference 6/4 DC

Posted on May 28th, 2019 in Uncategorized | No Comments »

Today the NanoBusiness Commercialization Association (NanoBCA) is excited to share the Final Agenda for our:

18th Annual NanoBusiness Conference
Tuesday, June 4, 2019

REGISTER HERE $250

CONFERENCE LOCATION

K&L Gates
1601 K Street, NW
Washington, D.C. 20006-1600

This year’s event will feature experts from private industry, representatives from government agencies, and public policy leaders who will address the opportunities and challenges in the ongoing commercialization of nanotechnology-based products and nanomaterials.

AGENDA

8:00-9:00  Registration & Continental Breakfast

9:00-9:30  Opening Remarks
– Vincent Caprio, Executive Director, NanoBCA
– Paul Stimers, Partner, K&L Gates
– Steve Waite, Author, Venture Investing in Science & Quantum Investing

9:30-10:00  Doyle Edwards, Director, Government Programs, Brewer Science

10:00-10:30  Matthew Putman, PhD, CEO, Nanotronics Imaging

10:30-11:00 Lisa Friedersdorf, PhD, Director, NNCO

11:00-11:30  Lynn L. Bergeson, Managing Director, Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

11:30-12:15  Arthur Herman, PhD, Senior Fellow, Hudson Institute; New York Times Bestselling Author; Pulitzer Prize Finalist

12:15-1:00  Lunch

1:00-1:30  Jim Phillips, Chairman & CEO, Covenant Ventures

1:30-2:00  Penelope T. Salmons, President/COO, Fibrtec Inc

2:00-2:30  Hugues Jacquemin, CEO, OCSiAI LLC

2:30-3:00  Samuel Brauer, PhD, Principal, Nanotech Plus, LLC

3:00-3:30  Anis Rahman, PhD, Chief Technology Officer, Applied Research & Photonics, Inc

3:30-4:00  Marco Curreli, PhD, Founder & Executive Director, Omni Nano

4:00-4:30 Deb Newberry, CEO, Newberry Technologies

4:30-5:00  FBI: Economic Espionage Program – Topic: Intellectual Property Theft/Industrial Espionage

5:00-6:00  Post-Conference Networking


—————————————————————————
NanoBCA Interview Series

The NanoBCA Interview Series offers in-depth interviews with some of the key stakeholders influencing our nanotechnology community today. Many of these dynamic professionals will be participants at our 18th Annual NanoBusiness Conference. Below you will find links to interviews featuring:

Greg Schmergel
Co-Founder, Chairman & CEONantero, Inc.

Paul Stimers
Partner
K&L Gates

Arthur Herman, PhD
Senior Fellow, Hudson Institute
New York Times Bestselling Author
Pulitzer Prize Finalist

—————————————————————————

18th Annual NanoBusiness Conference Media Partner

Precision Nanomedicine

—————————————————————————
Questions in regard to the event may be directed to:
Vincent Caprio, Executive Director, NanoBCA
vincent@nanobca.org

—————————————————————————
Our 18th Annual NanoBusiness Conference offers outstanding opportunities to connect with a diverse nanotechnology-related group of professionals in the heart of Washington DC.  We hope you will be able to join us!


Speaker Announcement: Water 2.0 Conference 6/5 DC

Posted on May 8th, 2019 in Uncategorized | No Comments »

Today we are excited to share a Speaker Announcement for our next Water 2.0 Conference.

Water 2.0 Conference: Advancing Water Infrastructure Repair
Wednesday, June 5, 2019

CONFERENCE LOCATION(S)

We will be meeting at 10:00am for a continental breakfast at the law offices of K&L Gates1601 K Street, NW, Washington, DC.From there we will proceed to Russell Senate Building, Room 385 where the conference will be located.

Speakers for the Water 2.0 Conference Include:

Mark Modzelewski, General Partner, Treeline Interactive

Paul Clayson, CEO, AgilePQ

Alan Hinchman, Chief Revenue Officer, GrayMatter Systems

Nate Wilson, Water Quality Product Lead, Mueller

Karen Sorber, Executive Chair/CEO, Micronic Technologies

Kenneth E. Russell, PhD, Consulting Executive and Author

Jim Hurd, Director, GreenScience Exchange

Vincent Caprio, Water 2.0 Executive Director & Conference Chair

—————————————————————————
Questions in regard to the event may be directed to:
Vincent Caprio vincent@water2.org

Click here to see completed Water 2.0 events

—————————————————————————
WATER NEWS

Trump and Pelosi both claim progress after infrastructure meeting
Los Angeles Times

Democrats say Trump agrees to $2 trillion for infrastructure, but details unclear
USA Today

Trump, Pelosi infrastructure talks invite skepticism
The Hill

Flint’s Water Crises Started 5 Years Ago. It’s Not Over.
The New York Times

Microplastics are raining down from the sky
National Geographic

At our current pace it’ll take 80 years to repair all the structurally deficient bridges in the US, a report finds
CNN

Jerry Merryman, Inventor of the Pocket Calculator, Dies at 86
Newsweek

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The Water 2.0 Conference Series offers outstanding opportunities to connect with a diverse water-related group of professionals in the heart of Washington DC.  We hope you will be able to join us!

Agenda Announcement: 18th Annual NanoBusiness Conference 6/4 DC

Posted on May 8th, 2019 in Uncategorized | No Comments »

Today the NanoBusiness Commercialization Association (NanoBCA) is proud to announce Arthur Herman, PhD, Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute, New York Times Bestselling Author and Pulitzer Prize Finalist as a speaker at our 18th Annual NanoBusiness Conference. We recently interviewed Arthur Herman for our NanoBCA Interview Series. Click here to read the interview. We are very excited to have Arthur join us on June 4th in DC!

18th Annual NanoBusiness Conference
Tuesday, June 4, 2019

REGISTER HERE $250

CONFERENCE LOCATION

K&L Gates
1601 K Street, NW
Washington, D.C. 20006-1600

This year’s event will feature experts from private industry, representatives from government agencies, and public policy leaders who will address the opportunities and challenges in the ongoing commercialization of nanotechnology-based products and nanomaterials.

AGENDA

8:00-8:30  Registration & Continental Breakfast

8:30-9:00  Opening Remarks
– Vincent Caprio, Executive Director, NanoBCA
– Paul Stimers, Partner, K&L Gates
– Steve Waite, Author, Venture Investing in Science & Quantum Investing

9:00-9:30  Doyle Edwards, Director, Government Programs, Brewer Science

9:30-10:00  Arpana Verma, PhD, Chief Science Officer, NanoMech

10:00-10:30  Matthew Putman, PhD, CEO, Nanotronics Imaging

10:30-11:00 TBD

11:00-11:30  Lynn L. Bergeson, Managing Director, Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

11:30-12:15  Arthur Herman, PhD, Senior Fellow, Hudson Institute; New York Times Bestselling Author; Pulitzer Prize Finalist

12:15-1:00  Lunch

1:00-1:30  Jim Phillips, Chairman & CEO, Covenant Ventures

1:30-2:00  Penelope T. Salmons, President/COO, Fibrtec Inc

2:00-2:30  Hugues Jacquemin, CEO, OCSiAI LLC

2:30-3:00  Samuel Brauer, PhD, Principal, Nanotech Plus, LLC

3:00-3:30  Anis Rahman, PhD, Chief Technology Officer, Applied Research & Photonics, Inc

3:30-4:00  Marco Curreli, PhD, Founder & Executive Director, Omni Nano

4:00-4:30 Deb Newberry, CEO, Newberry Technologies

4:30-5:00  FBI: Economic Espionage Program – Topic: Intellectual Property Theft/Industrial Espionage

5:00-6:00  Post-Conference Networking

—————————————————————————
NanoBCA Interview Series

The NanoBCA Interview Series offers in-depth interviews with some of the key stakeholders influencing our nanotechnology community today. Many of these dynamic professionals will be participants at our 18th Annual NanoBusiness Conference. Below you will find links to interviews featuring:

Greg Schmergel
Co-Founder, Chairman & CEO
Nantero, Inc.

Paul Stimers
Partner
K&L Gates

—————————————————————————
18th Annual NanoBusiness Conference Media Partner
Precision Nanomedicine

—————————————————————————

Questions in regard to the event may be directed to:Vincent Caprio, Executive Director, NanoBCA
vincent@nanobca.org

—————————————————————————
Our 18th Annual NanoBusiness Conference offers outstanding opportunities to connect with a diverse nanotechnology-related group of professionals in the heart of Washington DC.  We hope you will be able to join us!